Music

This Woman's Gospel Singing Is So Moving

May 9th, 2019

If you’re a big music fan, you know just how important gospel music is to so many different genres that came after it.

For anyone who doesn’t know, gospel music is a genre of Christian music that goes back to the early 17th century. Although there are plenty of different regional varieties and variations, much of American roots and rock music takes many of its cues from traditional hymns and spirituals that came from the days of slavery. Still, it’s worth going back to the real thing to see where all our great music comes from.

If you’re interested in doing that, this clip is a perfect place to start.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The performance here comes from The Georgia Mass Choir, an American gospel group from Macon, Georgia.

The group was originally formed in 1983 by Reverend Milton Biggham and consists of 150 different members. Though they’ve given many iconic performances over the years, one of the songs they performed in 1989 called “Come On In The Room” has truly stood the test of time.p On YouTube, it has gathered some 18 million views on it has been shared hundreds of thousands of times on Facebook.

And once you see the video, you’ll understand why.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

As the clip begins, the Reverend begins by telling a story of a Southern family in hardship.

As he gives his sermon, the entire choir sways slowly behind him. As the story progresses, he explains that the family has a brother who has just been in a car accident. They stop at a house they see on the side of the road and ask to come in to call a doctor.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Though the woman lets them in, they call the doctor and the doctor says he won’t be available that day. Shortly after that, the mother in the family asks if the woman has a closet.

At this, the Reverend has set up the beginning of the song and the crowd goes wild.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

As the song starts, the woman closes the doors, gets down on her knees and begins to pray.

At this point, one of the other choir members hands the microphone to one of the older women in the choir. She begins to sing the lyrics to “Come On In The Room” deeply and soulfully. Once she gets through the first part on her own, the entire choir joins her from behind with a beautiful chorus.

Though it takes about four minutes to get to this point, the music is only beginning to truly swell.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

As it continues, the choir gets louder and louder and everyone in the church knows all the words.

Later on, the Reverend starts to sing along with the others as well. Next up, he pulls another one of the choir members out to do a solo of her own. Although everything has been incredible so far, the newer woman has an even more powerful and soulful voice than anyone so far. While the modern image of a Christian church is typically a reserved, quiet place—and that prayer needs to be solemn and serious.

Though it goes without saying, this clip disproves all of that!

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Though the performance is a long one, it’s not hard to see why it’s remained so popular throughout the years.

While many churches use music as a form of prayer, and plenty of non-religious people even think of great music as a form of prayer sometimes, this clip shows the true meaning of how music can be a prayer.

swiggle1 dot pattern2
YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Even though it runs for a long time, the emotion in the clip is powerful enough to move anybody who watches it. Regardless of what your personal beliefs are, this clip is a great history lesson and is sure to touch you.

Watch the entire thing below:

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Sources: YouTube/Old School Gospel Channel, Wikipedia (1, 2)

Advertisement
Advertisement