Singing
Friends sing traditional Native American song in English and it’s absolutely beautiful
This is so beautiful.
D.G. Sciortino
06.24.22

Singing makes you happy… it’s science. According to Goldsmiths University of London, singing boosts endorphin flow, just like exercises, and releases “feel good” chemicals in your brain.

This creates a sense of euphoria, relieves pain, and can also boost your immune response. But singing is also a highly sacred and spiritual experience in many cultures.

Especially in Native American communities where each community has its own distinct history, language, and musical culture.

“These communities—although united in placing music at the center of public life—have developed extraordinarily diverse and multifaceted performance traditions,” Britannica reports. “Native Americans trace the ultimate origin of their traditional music to the time of creation, when specific songs or musical repertories were given to the first people by the Creator and by spirit beings in the mythic past.”

Some of these sacred songs are considered “complete” and new music cannot be composed for them.

But other songs can be reinvented or adapted by new generations.

“But many occasions are suitable for new music; this music may be received in a variety of ways. For example, shamans and other individuals may experience dreams or visions in which spirit beings teach them new songs, dances, and rituals. Many Indian communities learn new songs and repertories from their neighbors and have a long history of adopting musical practices from outsiders,” Britannica says.

“Yet in every case, the music is a gift that comes from beyond the individual or community. New music is provided each year for specific occasions in some communities. An individual may have a vision or dream in which he or she learns a new song; the song may be presented to the community or retained for personal use. More often, however, musical creativity is a collective process.”

The Guy - YouTube
Source:
The Guy - YouTube

Joyful practices, like singing, are always best done with friends and people you love for maximum joy and fun.

Some of the best memories we have are engaging in jam-out sessions with our friends in the car.

Antoine “Tone” Edwards decided to share one such car jam sesh in a video recording online.

The Guy - YouTube
Source:
The Guy - YouTube

Tone is a rapper and youth motivational speaker from Omaha, Nebraska and is from the UMOnHOn & Lakota tribes, according to Reshareworthy.

The video shows Tone, sitting in the passenger seat, and his buddies driver Butchie Easton, Elton, and Doug singing a traditional Native American Pow Wow song. They decided to sing the song in English, instead of the native tongue, while beating a drum.

The Guy - YouTube
Source:
The Guy - YouTube

The fellas take turns singing the lyrics:

“Why don’t you come, why don’t you stay,

I wouldn’t mind to see that smile every day,

Why do you stay,

Don’t worry, I won’t bite, I won’t put up a fuss or a fight

Ahh yayy what do you say?

You can be my babe.”

The Guy - YouTube
Source:
The Guy - YouTube

The men then chant together before restarting their verse again.

Their song is very beautiful and powerfully healing.

The entire song goes on for about 1:44. The song was uploaded in 2013 and has received more than 71,412 views.

The Guy - YouTube
Source:
The Guy - YouTube

“The beautiful blending of genuine culture and modern flows,” one commenter said.

“That was great! Love the vibe of these young men,” said another.

“LOVE THIS!! Beautiful music and drum! Great job!!” and another.

You can watch this beautiful song sung among friends in the video below.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

By D.G. Sciortino
hi@sbly.com
D.G. is a contributing writer in Shareably. She's based in Connecticut and can be reached at hi@shareably.net.
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